Oops, We Took 20 Years of Your Life by Mistake. Have a Nice Day: What society owes the exonerated

It’s nice to see an exoneree doing well. But exonerees are entitled to much, much more than $50,000 per year of incarceration. They should be paid, and especially if they’ve done what this exoneree has done, they should be honored.

Wrongful Convictions Blog

From TheMarshallProject.org

By: Jarrett Adams

The recent and tragic suicide of my friend and fellow exoneree Darryl Hunt is a stark reminder that no monetary compensation can make up for the psychological toll of wrongful conviction. When a wrongfully convicted person is released from prison, it’s often to a throng of reporters clamoring to capture images of an emotional reunion with his smiling family and friends, and lawyers. These images instill a sense of vindication and a happy ending. But what is too often unseen is how difficult it is to re-enter society after years or decades of confinement — especially if you are innocent. These are the unseen scars, and too many states pay them inadequate attention, or none at all.

In 1984, when he was 19, Darryl, an African-American man, was convicted of a crime he didn’t commit, the rape and murder of a young white woman in…

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